Oklahoma City Bombing Memorial (part 2)

In my last post, I went over  the outdoor memorial for the Oklahoma City Bombing Memorial. And I want to apologize for having the wrong year, 1985, instead of 1995.  The post has been edited, but if you receive the blog via e-mail, it had the wrong date.

Today will cover the Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum.  The museum is one of the best museums I have ever visited.  It takes you through the day of the bombing, the days and weeks that followed, and has many first hand stories from the survivors and first responders.  It chronicles the investigation and trials of the domestic terrorists, and has a moving memorial to the victims at the end of the museum.

When you walk into the first of two floors in the museum, you are greeted with a large mural of downtown Oklahoma City with the words, “A day like any other” on the wall.  You will learn about the history of the Alfred P Murrah Federal Building, along with what the times were like in 1995.  There is a “technology display,” which contains these “state of the art” cell phones and pagers! (and remember the cell phone plugged in to the cigarette lighter…now called a 12 volt charger!).  Just 14% of the population was connected to the internet in 1995.

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Also on display is an old closed circuit television camera, and video taken from a nearby office building of a Ryder rental truck driving down the street in Oklahoma City, heading to the Federal Building.

You enter into ‘the hearing room’ and sit down to listen to an audio recording from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board Meeting that was going on in a nearby building.  Just a few minutes into the hearing, at 9:02 am, the tape recorder picks up the sound of an explosion.  I was struck by how loud the explosion was.  It is the only documented recording of the blast.  The doors from the hearing room open, and you walk into a room containing many artifacts from the bombing.

This clock, from a nearby office building, stopped at 9:02 am.  The lower left has a date book from one of the victims in the Murrah building, and the lower right portion of the photo is an electric pencil sharpener.

P1010824The next photo below has a piece of an elevator panel, car door frame, light fixtures and plaster found in the rubble.

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A few pieces of the bronze letters to the federal building were found amongst the rubble.  They were pitted and scarred from the blast.

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A Florida license plate was also found in the rubble, which provided investigators clues to the bombing.  The plate belonged to a Ryder rental truck.

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At 10:28 am, first responders were ordered to evacuate the building, as a box labeled “explosives” was found in the building.  The box was removed by the bomb squad, and rescue efforts resumed.  This was the item in that box, called a TOW missile (tube-launched, optically-tracked, wireless-guided) missile, used by the US Customs office, which was located in the building.

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One of the many stories told in the museum, is that of Daina Bradley.  She was at the Federal Building, along with her two children, her mother and her sister.  They had gone to the Social Security Office to obtain a social security card  for her new son.  Rescuers found her trapped under a concrete beam, and they started to dig her out from under the rubble.  But then they had to abandon her, when they were ordered to evacuate the building as a result of the bomb scare at 10:28am.  Once the ‘all clear’ was received, rescuers went back to her and spent two hours trying to dig her out, but were unable to do so.  Her lower leg remained trapped, and the only way to rescue her was to amputate her leg.  An orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Andy Sullivan, attempted to amputate her leg with a scalpel, but had to abandon her after another bomb scare, at 1:48 pm, forced all the rescuers to again evacuate the building.  After the ‘all clear,’ he again returns to her, and using a nylon rope as a tourniquet, is able to complete the amputation using his pocket knife.  This was done without anesthesia. Ms. Bradley survived the bombing, but her mother and both of her children did not.  Her sister was severely injured.  Below are the items donated to the museum by Dr. Sullivan.  This is just one of the many gut-wrenching stories told in the museum.

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One of the heart-warming things I took away was how quickly, and compassionately the citizens of Oklahoma City responded to this bombing.  There are photographs of nurses running down the street towards the site of the bombing carrying hospital supplies and blankets to help the victims.  A triage was set up outside the building.

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There was a food and restaurant convention going on in downtown Oklahoma City, and those members quickly used the equipment that they brought to display at their sales booths, to set up an impromptu ‘restaurant’ to feed all the first responders.  Fire Departments from all over the country sent personnel to help with the rescue efforts.  Sadly, one of the members from the New York Fire Department that helped in the rescue efforts in Oklahoma City, was killed in the 9/11 bombing in 2001.

A piece of the original chain link fenced is on display at the museum, with a small portion of the items sent to Oklahoma City from all over the world.

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The museum has an in-depth timeline on the investigation and prosecution of Timothy McVeigh,  Terry Nichols and Michael and Lori Fortier.  I won’t go into too much detail on them, or the reasons behind the bombing. For me, this visit was about honoring the victims and the survivors. But I will say that McVeigh was sentenced to death, Nichols is serving a life sentence, Michael Fortier served 12 years, and Lori was given immunity in exchange for her testimony.

Timothy McVeigh was stopped at 10:17 am, just seventy-five minutes after the bombing, on I-35 by an Oklahoma State Trooper for having a missing license plate on this 1977 Mercury Grand Marquis.  During questioning, the trooper noticed McVeigh had a concealed handgun, and took him into custody.

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By April 22, federal investigators had put together enough evidence from the bombing site to come up with a suspect, McVeigh, and discovered he was being held in Perry, Oklahoma on the handgun related charges.  He was taken into federal custody, and was wearing this t-shirt at the time of his arrest.  The Latin phrase means “Thus always to tyrants,” and was the phrase John Wilkes Booth shouted when he shot President Lincoln.  McVeigh’s booking photo is in the bottom corner of the photo.

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On May 23, 1995, the Murrah Building was imploded.  At the time, it was thought there were just two remaining bodies in the building, both employees of the credit union.   They allowed the two families to hold a memorial service prior to the implosion.  After the implosion, they found the remains of three bodies.  The third person, who had been reported missing a week before the implosion by his sister, was believed to have been in the credit union as a customer during the explosion.

The last part of the museum is the Gallery of Honor, where photographs of all 168 victims are on display, along with mementos provided by family members. Putting a face with a name, and seeing the objects in the display cases, was a heartfelt way to remember the victims.   The name of every victim is read over a speaker in the room.  The room is a wonderful memorial, but difficult to walk through, without fighting back the tears.

The museum has a STEM lab, for teachers and students to learn more about the bombing, forensics and investigations, and how to engineer and build structures that can withstand both natural and man-made disasters.

The one thing I will always remember from my visit to the museum, is how well everyone came together to help each other out.  It was even noted in the museum that the crime rate in Oklahoma City was almost non-existent for weeks after the bombing. The resilience of the people in Oklahoma City is amazing. I left the museum emotionally drained, but at peace knowing good always conquers evil.

Quote of the Day:  “We don’t even know how strong we are until we are forced to bring that hidden strength forward.  In times of tragedy, of war, of necessity, people do amazing things.  The human capacity for survival and renewal is awesome.” – Isabel Allende

Oklahoma City Memorial (part one)

Oklahoma City has been a ‘bucket list’ item for me for many years.  In particular, visiting the Oklahoma City National Memorial.  April 19, 1995 is a day cemented in my memory, as it started out with an early morning telephone call from my sister Margie, saying she was in labor, and heading to the hospital.  I had asked if I should come to the hospital, and she said no, she would call later and let me know.  And then I went to work and waited and waited (remember, this was before text messaging, and the days of “instant” everything!).  But then I received word that my sister had a beautiful baby girl, Hannah Catherine!  A wonderful start to the day!

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But the world as we knew it, greatly changed at 9:02 am, April 19, 1995, with the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City.  What started out, for me, as a joyous occasion, became a day of sorrow and confusion.  Even though it has been 23 years, I do remember that day well.  When I went to see my sister in the hospital, and met my niece for the first time, I recall my sister was emotionally drained by the days events.  She had just given birth to her first child, only to turn on the television in the morning to see babies and children being carried out of the building.  It was a horrifying scene.  Of the 168 people killed in the bombing, 19 of them were children, as there was a daycare in the federal building that many employees used.

This is a picture that I took of a photo on display at the museum, showing the devastation from the blast.

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And the site as it looks today, as viewed from a window in the museum.

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It was an emotional day 23 years ago, and it was an emotional and difficult day for me when we visited the memorial.  I had to choke back a lot of tears in the museum and at the memorial site.  I just kept thinking about what my sister had gone through that day, but kept telling myself that out of something so horrible, life does keep going on.  There are really two parts to the memorial:  A museum which chronicles the events of that day, with many first hand survivor stories, and an outdoor memorial, honoring the victims, survivors, first responders, and children.

The museum is located in a building that was across the street from the federal building. (it is the building in the foreground from the photo above).  It was an office building at the time, and was one of over 300 buildings in the downtown area that sustained damage from the blast.  Although no one was killed in this building, many were injured from ceilings collapsing, and broken glass from the windows getting blown out.

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The outdoor memorial consists of the gates of time, a reflecting pool, field of empty chairs, survivor wall, survivor tree, rescuer’s orchard, children’s area and the fence.  Today’s blog will just cover the outside memorial.

When you approach the museum from the parking lot, 200 feet of the original chain-link fence that surrounded the bomb site is still in place. Over 60,000 items were put on the fence, and have been collected and archived in the museum.   And even today, people continue to place items on the fence, especially shoes, in memory of the victims and survivors.  Many of the bombings survivors talked about how they had their shoes literally blown off their feet during the blast, and first responders reported finding many shoes, but no bodies, during their initial search and rescue efforts.

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After viewing the fence, you walk up through the gates of time.  Two very large walls that frame the time of the events.  9:01 am, when it was just another day…

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And then 9:03 am, when the time for healing began…

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In between is the reflecting pool, symbolizing 9:02 am, when the bombing occurred, and the world was forever changed.  The pool and gates of time is where N. W. Fifth Street, the street in front of the federal building, was located at.

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After the Murrah building was imploded, a few walls remained standing, despite going through not one, but two blasts.  These walls were left in place, and the names of the survivors are on one of the walls.

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An American Elm tree was located between the Murrah building, and the office building that is now the site of the museum.  Despite the blast, that tree survived, and has become known as the Survivor Tree.  Arborists have carefully maintained this tree, and every year seeds from the tree have been given out to families of the victims as well as the survivors, for planting.  It is a symbol, once again, of life continuing on from a tragic event.

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The Survivor’s Tree overlooks the Rescuer’s Orchard, to honor all the first responders, medical personnel and volunteers that helped out.  The inscription along the base of the survivor’s tree states “To the courageous and caring who responded from near and far, we offer our eternal gratitude, as a thank you to the thousands of rescuer and volunteers who helped.”

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Rescuer’s Orchard

Right in front of the entrance to the museum is the Children’s Area.  Thousands of tiles painted by children were sent to Oklahoma City after the bombing, and they have been placed on a wall.

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The most somber area is the Field of Reflecting Chairs, located where the Murrah building was located.   There are 168 chairs, each bearing the name of a victim of the bombing.  Nineteen of the chairs are small, for each of the children.  There are nine rows of chairs to represent each floor of the building, and five chairs are off to the right, representing the five victims killed outside of the building.  The chairs have a light underneath them, but we did not go back to see the memorial at night.

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Across the street, and not part of the official memorial, is a statue, Jesus Wept, on the grounds of St. Joseph Catholic Church, which was also damaged in the bombing.  There are 19 black granite pillars surrounding the statue, for the children.

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I found the outdoor memorial to be a well-designed tribute and remembrance to the victims, survivors, first responders and volunteers that came together after this tragic event.  It was very emotional and humbling to see.

There was just too much to put in one post on this memorial.  My next post will be on the museum itself.   As I started this post about my sister Margie, and niece Hannah, I will end it with them as well.  Happy Birthday Hannah!

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Hannah and my sister, Margie

My Quote for the Day is from the quote on the back of the Gates of Time:

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“We come here to remember those who were killed, those who survived and those changed forever.  May all who leave here know the impact of violence.  May this Memorial offer comfort, strength, peace, hope and serenity.”

TX: Perot Museum of Nature and Science

One of our options when we bought the Dallas City Pass (highly recommended if you will be in the area) is the Perot Museum of Nature and Science.  Since it was Spring Break week during our visit, it was a very busy place.  If you have ever been to a museum with a school class field trip, imagine that times 100!  It’s a great place for kids, and those young at heart, as they have five levels of inter-active exhibits.  We visited with my sister LuAnn, husband John and our niece Alicia.

The five children of former Presidential Candidate Ross Perot (yes, he is still alive) donated $50 million dollars in 2008 to purchase land in Dallas and build a museum to honor their parents.  The museum opened in December of 2012.

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There are eleven different exhibit halls, and one traveling exhibit, which happened to be The Journey to Space while we were there.  Perhaps a future trip to Mars is in Alicia’s future?

 

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LuAnn and Alicia

The exhibits cover everything from the life of birds, dinosaurs, energy and drilling, gems and minerals, engineering (complete with robots that you can play with), geology, geography, weather, etc.  There is something for everyone.  They have a small platform that you can stand on that simulates an earthquake, and you can practice being a weather forecaster.  Despite the crowds, it was a fun day.

 

They have a large display of cast skeletons, including this giant turtle…

P1010542A flying Pterodactyl with a small body, but large wing-span…

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And Tyrannosaurus  Rex, from McCone County, Montana.  North America’s top predator during the Cretaceous Period, a mere 66 million years ago…

P1010537They have many large gems and minerals on display.  What’s the difference between a gem and a mineral, you ask?  A gem is a mineral, that has been polished or cut into facets that reflect the mineral’s crystal structure.

A mineral is a naturally occurring, inorganic substance with distinct physical properties and a crystalline structure derived from its chemical composition.  Not all  minerals are gems, but all gems are minerals.  Sort of like bourbon is a whiskey, but not all whiskey is bourbon.  Anyway, here’s a few photos.  This is Scolecite, from Ahmednagar, India.  The crystal system is Monoclinic.

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This is a large Opal, from Opal Butte, Morrow County, Oregon.  Crystal system is Amorphous.

179068AC-1CD7-46FE-86E4-AB5150F21682This is Rhodochrosite, Crystal system is Trigonal.  It is from the Sweet Home Mine, Mount Bross, Alma District, Colorado.

CC270A1C-FC6F-41FF-A6AA-6A1C6F095219And finally, this one is Cavansite and Stilbite.  Crystal system Orthohombic, from the Wahgoli Quarry in Maharashtra, India.  The display of minerals was very interesting.

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The museum has several 3D educational movies as well.  For those with young children, they do have an area just for children 5 and under.  It was nice to see so many families, with children of all ages, spending time learning.

 

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John, LuAnn and Alicia

Quote for the Day:  “It is so compelling to hear how many great researchers, scientists, engineers, doctors, and educators first became interested in their chosen fields as a result of visiting a great museum of science or natural history.  It is our hope that this museum can be an inspiration to the next generation of pioneers, discoverers and visionaries.”  – Nancy Perot Mulford (one of the Perot’s children)

 

Dallas: The Six Floor Museum

Dan and I spent a wonderful 10 days in the Dallas area visiting with my sister LuAnn, husband John and her soon to be “adult” daughter Alicia.  The weather was great, and the company excellent, despite what Makena had to say in her lost blog post!  Today we drove about 200 miles north, to Oklahoma City.  But I have several more things to post about our stay in Dallas.

If you have any interest at all in history and presidents, you must stop and visit The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza.  The museum is more commonly referred to as the Texas School Book Depository, the site of the assassination of President John F Kennedy.  While LuAnn was busy taking Alicia for her driver’s license exam (she passed!), Dan, John and I headed to downtown Dallas to visit the museum, as well as the nearby Reunion Tower.

The sixth and seventh floor of the building have now been turned into a museum, and the window that Lee Harvey Oswald fired from has been preserved.  The original floor, windows and lights are enclosed behind a glass wall, and replica boxes remain stacked just as the Dallas Police found them in that area.  (no photography is permitted on the sixth floor.)  When you enter the museum, you receive an audio recorder, similar in size to a cell phone, that plays recordings on dozens of displays set up on the sixth floor.  You go through a chronological order of events on that fateful day, as well as the shooting of Oswald by Jack Ruby, and the many hearings that took place on the shooting.

For the conspiracy theorists, they do spend some time covering all the “what ifs” and “who else was involved.”  It’s a very thorough display, but it will take a good 90 minutes to get through just listening to all the audio and the videos they have on display.  We enjoyed it, but I did see some folks looking a bit exhausted by the end of the tour.

They do allow you to take photos from the seventh floor window, so here is a photo one floor above the window that Oswald shot Kennedy from.  The Reunion Tower is in the upper left.

P1010243 (2)I marked up another photo that I took from the seventh floor window. (if you double-click on the photo, you can make it larger).  The two red circles mark the spots where Kennedy was shot.  The city has painted “X” on each spot.  The farther spot, in between the two cars, is where Kennedy was fatally wounded. The trees have grown since 1963, so the view back then would be much clearer to the street.

P1010244 (2)_LIHere is a view of the same area, from the sidewalk just in front of the building.  Again, the red lines are where he was struck, and the green “X” to the right is the infamous “grassy knoll area,” popular among the conspiracy theorists that believe a second gunman was there.  The “X” is also the spot where Abraham Zapruder was standing when he shot the 8mm film of the assassination. His film was the only film of the shooting.

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I was always open to the possibility of a second shooter, until I physically visited this area and was struck by how small, and close to the street, the grassy knoll is.  Here is a view of the grassy knoll from the sidewalk.

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To put things in perspective, here is a view looking back towards the sixth floor window.  Dan and John are in the ‘purple square’ mark.  The blue circle is the spot of the fatal shot.  The Grassy Knoll is not a big area.  Everything is much closer in person, in comparison to how they show it on television.  P1010330_LI (2)

There is now a web-cam hidden in the boxes stacked up on the sixth floor window.  Now had that web cam been in place on November 22, 1963……!!

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After visiting the museum, we walked over to the Reunion Tower, to view the city of Dallas from 470 feet above.P1010506And of course, I took another view of the museum.

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Here are a few more photos from the tower.

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This is the Dallas jail and courthouse complex.

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Dan and John enjoying the view from the Geo-Deck.

P1010442If you are going to Dallas, be sure to check out the City-Pass, as it gives you a discounted pass to four attractions.

Quote for the Day:  “Learn to enjoy every minute of your life.  Be happy now.  Don’t wait for something outside of yourself to make you happy in the future.  Think how really precious is the time you have to spend, whether it’s at work or with your family.  Every minute should be enjoyed and savored.” – Earl Nightingale

 

Louisville Slugger Museum and Amazon update

Amazon Update

Week three at Amazon is in the books.  We have again signed up for voluntary overtime on Tuesday.  As such, we have not been doing too much on our off days, besides resting, laundry, grocery shopping and planning out the weeks meals (my crock pot is getting a good workout).  The work has been pretty steady, with more Halloween costumes, as well as winter coats, mittens and thermal underwear this week.

In talking with some full-time employees, they are anticipating a better “peak season” than last year at this center.  When we arrived last year, it was crazy busy and chaotic.  We have not seen that yet this year.  Last year they started their peak in August, and the employees had mandatory overtime from August through December.  It is mostly voluntary overtime at this time. This year they are expecting peak season to start in mid-November.  And as of now, they may not need to work the 11 hour shifts like they did last year.  Some employees are happy about that, others wanted the overtime (more money).  We shall see.  Ultimately, the customer drives the business.

Louisville Slugger Museum

In June of 2012, a year before we went full-time, we attended the Good Sam’s Rally in Louisville, Kentucky.  We were able to look at hundreds of RV’s, attend seminars, and talk with many full-time RVer’s.  Many of them made the same comment:  if I could do it all over again, I would have started sooner.

During the seminar, we took some time to explore the Louisville area, including a visit to the Louisville Slugger Museum, right in downtown Louisville.  The museum is part of the factory, where they still make over 8,000 different models of bats for both professional and amateur players.  The museum and factory have a distinctive 120 foot tall bat located outside.  It is made of steel, and painted to look like wood.  It is a replica of Babe Ruth’s bat.

Louisville Slugger Museum

Louisville Slugger Museum

The museum has on display bats from many players, including this Babe Ruth bat from 1927, the year that Ruth hit 60 home runs.

The Babe

The Babe

They do allow you to hold several bats used from several hall of fame players (after you put on some protective batting gloves).  I was able to take a few practice swings with a bat used by Mickey Mantle.

swinging away

swinging away

They have a tribute to the women who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (remember that Tom Hanks/Madonna movie?).

There's no crying in baseball!

There’s no crying in baseball!

We toured the factory (no photos allowed inside) and watched several bats being produced.  They used to hand carve the bats using a lathe, but now can produce several bats in just minutes on a machine.  In the museum, there is one window that looks into the factory.  The blue machine is what is used today to manufacture bats.

inside the factory

inside the factory

They have a boring machine that is used to extract billets from a log.  The billets are then placed into the machine and carved into the bats.

billets in a log

billets in a log

It’s a very interesting tour, and everyone receives a souvenir mini bat when you leave.

hanging with the Babe

hanging with the Babe

Quote for the day:  “Baseball is ninety percent mental, and the other half physical.” – Yogi Berra